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Who are the Europeans?


The University of Michigan at Ann Arbor
Center for European Studies and European Union Center

present

CONVERSATIONS ON EUROPE LECTURE SERIES

"The Dilemma of European Integration: Who are the Europeans (and why does that matter for politics)?"
A lecture by Neil Fligstein, Professor of Sociology, U-C Berkeley
Thursday, March 30, 4:20 pm
Room 1636, International Institute


The main mechanism of further political integration is not to be located in Brussels, but instead within the populations of Western Europe who have increasingly gained as a result of the EU tearing down trade barriers. Managers, professionals, educated people, people with higher incomes, and the young have increasingly found themselves in situations where they routinely interact with their counterparts from other countries. These are the people who have come to see themselves as Europeans and who have pushed forward the integration project. Yet, the future of the European project now turns on the degree to which other parts of the population become enmeshed in more routine social relations with their counterparts in other countries.


An interesting lecture announcement. But what about cultural policies and artists? Do they not also shape the European cultural identity and landscape, particularly in local communities?

Comments:

Blogger Karla said . . .

Yeah, who wants to hear more about Yuppies, even if they are European ones?    

11:59 PM, March 16, 2006


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