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First Day


I officially met a new contact at the university this morning. In the course of the meeting I received instructions on how to use a university email account. They were conveniently printed (in English) in the form of a two-page letter. It was kind of touching, but at the same time reminded me of the difference between here and my "real" academic home. At home, you get an identity code or number and a password. I don't ever recall receiving any extended instructions, except perhaps verbally in an orientation. There used to be a sort of disclaimer when you logged into the email system and university computers but, though I'm sure it's still there, now you don't see it anymore.

Well, that's not the case here. In fact, the iInstructions are rather explicit. And they don't leave much room for, well, personal thought or motivation or error. Viz:
Dear User,

Provided you find anything unclear while installing [this seems to be a given], . . . go back to the start page and click on Instructions. After following the instructions, click on Personal Administration and try to log in again.

You should also change your password into the one known just to you using the change my password reference. It is therefore vital that you handle your password the way that prevents it from being misused.

I do agree that passwords must be looked out for—there is a great deal of password molestation around here and it ain't pretty. Using "the" correctly (i.e., the use of "the")is tricky for many non-native speakers, but really, what if I want to change my password to that other one known just to me. Do I have no options? To find out, you might contact a system administrator via the email system and see what happens:
The system uses the mailbox as a destination for the messages. . . . [Thank you for clearing that up.] It is every user's duty to read the messages delivered to the mailbox and follow the instructions they contain.

If you do not comply immediately upon receiving messages, you will be contacted by the Vice-Associate Sub-Rector of the Faculty of Mind Control.

Looking forward to future cooperation,

the Information Services team

There was one falsified sentence in the above, but overall that was about the gist of it. Beware the medium and the message.


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