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Hard at work, see?



Hard at work, see?
Originally uploaded by youplayawhat.
Just so you know that I haven't fallen off into the gaping blank of field research that is not going smoothly, here is a photo to show I did something today. Yay! A productive day at the library at long last. I got a pep talk last weekend about my dissertation, plus an infusion of social contact, while visiting Prague; on top of that, Karla has advice about how to search periodicals. This made the return to library research much easier than initially feared. Hey, even if living people don't talk (or, rather, I don't talk to them), they can't shut up the interviews that they have already given.

The page illustrated at left is from Folk & Country, a monthly Czech-language journal (this is March 2000). You can see a picture of a folk singer, who is being profiled, standing next to the larger-than-life (and larger than the singer) Brno personality, actor Bolka (formally Boleslav, or "Pain-glory," but just Bolka to his enthralled publics, which include just about every Czech-speaking person on the planet) Polívka.* I saw a very wonderful Christmas concert in his theater last December. Mr. Plocek offers a testimonial to the singer, calling her the "discreet/prudent Wallachian chansonier."

You can probably even analyze my handwritten notes if you're into that kind of thing.

* Polívka has had a long career and appears, it seems, in just about every other Czech film that is released nowadays. Among many other successes, he plays the father in the film Musíme si pomáhat (titled Divided We Fall in English) and he recently played the artist in Pupendo.

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Comments:

Blogger Karla said . . .

Aw come on, if you want your handwritten notes analyzed, you have only to ask.    

8:09 PM, April 21, 2006


Blogger Joe said . . .

I'll look at your notes. Drive them over tomorrow, why don't you?
Keep up the good work Jesse, your diss. will bet great.    

4:02 AM, April 22, 2006


Blogger Joe said . . .

Be great, not "bet" great.    

4:03 AM, April 22, 2006


Blogger morskyjezek said . . .

I don't actually feel the need to have an analysis of my handwriting, but I was too lazy to cut those out of the picture. Plus it seemed to lend veracity to the claim that I've done "something." We'll leave the result open.

Along those lines, you can always bet on my dissertation if you want. :-) There is a chain of betting offices here that takes bets on just about anything under the sun (from sporting events to the number of babies that will be born on a given day), and the best part is that they don't even charge a "manipulation fee" (manipulační poplatek). So you get to be manipulated for free. Perhaps it isn't such a great idea after all. Yet another meaning for the ever so multivalent "manipulační."    

2:03 PM, April 22, 2006


Blogger Karla said . . .

Everything here is "manipulační ___." Why then is manipulační not in the Lingea dictionary????

I think it is time to start betting on the dissertation. Joe and I will start.    

9:24 PM, April 22, 2006


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